Thrangu Rinpoche Teaching on the Music of Great Bliss by Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche

Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche composed “The Music of Great Bliss” at the age of 19. In this provocative doha Trungpa Rinpoche presents Mahamudra as a girlfriend or lover. He thus explains the view, path, and fruition of Mahamudra in a direct and intimate way. Thrangu Rinpoche’s commentary on this text provides insight into the circumstances surrounding this doha and teaches the meaning of it with clarity and precision.

Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche was born in in eastern Tibet in 1939 and when he was 19 years old, he spent many harrowing months trekking over the Himalayas (described in his book, Born in Tibet). After narrowly escaping capture by the Chinese, he reached India in 1960. It was during this escape that Trungpa Rinpoche wrote A Symphony of Great Bliss which was an explanation of the Mahamudra approach to meditation based on Ju Mipham’s The Music of the Lute which presented the Dzogchen view.

Trungpa Rinpoche was a close dharma brother of Thrangu Rinpoche, and that long close friendship was the inspiration for Thrangu Rinpoche’s search for this lost spiritual song found in 2006. This teaching of four talks was translated by David Karma Choephel. The complete teaching in book form will be published by Shambhala Publications in August or 2020 as The Harmony of the View which includes two more teachings of Thrangu Rinpoche.

His Holiness the Karmapa Speaks on Compassion and the Nature of Mind

His Holiness the Karmapa gave a public talk in Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College, in New York City on July 2011.

His Holiness the Karmapa

As Long As Space Endures, May We Too Be There For Beings

“In traditional Buddhist practice there are ways of talking about the practice of great compassion and great love for sentient beings in which we use the metaphor of the sky and the planets, the stars, the sun and the moon to illustrate our commitment to be there with a heart full of love and compassion for sentient beings. We aspire that for as long as space endures, for as long as the sun and the moon remain in the sky, may we too be there with the heart of loving kindness and compassion to help sentient beings. May this connection between us and sentient beings remain.”

“And in my own personal contemplation, I often think of the moon as the keeper of love. So the moon becomes the metaphor or the symbol of the enduring quality of love and the connection between beings of loving kindness and compassion. Even though one may not be physically present with other sentient beings, those beings can look up into the sky and see the moon, and through that connection be able to feel the love that you have for them. We mutually can feel the love that we have for each other regardless of whether we are physically present, regardless of how much time has passed since the last time we saw each other.”

https://kagyuoffice.org/his-holiness-the-karmapa-speaks-on-compassion-and-the-nature-of-mind-on-the-eve-of-his-departure-to-india/

KSÖC News and Links

Lama Tashi shares inspirational teachings and perspective on current events.